‘Unprecedented’ water restrictions imposed for millions in Southern California 2022-04-27 16:15:15

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A massive, decades-long drought has caused water levels in the reservoirs to drop to record lows.

Unprecedented restrictions have been imposed on millions of residents in Southern California as the region’s massive drought continues and continues to grow.

About 6 million customers in Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Ventura counties under the Metropolitan Water area will be required to significantly reduce outdoor water use. However, they are still encouraged to hand their trees over with water, Capital City CEO Devin Upadhyay said during a press conference on Wednesday.

The Water District requires its member agencies in state water project dependent areas to limit outdoor irrigation to only one day per week, or equivalent.

Obadiai said the goal is to reduce overall water consumption by 35% in the face of water shortages. He added that if the restrictions do not lead to a 35% reduction in consumption, stricter rules may be followed next year.

Obadiai said the water district will monitor daily water use and the amount of water used, as well as how residents and businesses respond to these emergency restrictions.

After September 1, the water company may need to place more limits on the amount of water people can use, including banning all outdoor water use, Metropolitan City General Manager Adel Haj Khalil said, adding that the company recognizes that it will create ” a challenge to people. “

“Conservation should be a way of life for all of us,” he said, describing the new restrictions as unprecedented. “This is a wake-up call for everyone.”

The Metropolitan Water District uses water from the Colorado River as well as the State Water Project, which gets its water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta.

Colorado Now at the top One of the most endangered rivers in the country due to the massive drought.

Obadiai said anyone who does not comply with the new water district requirements will be fined $2,000 per foot and other penalties for the water the facility will have to supply.

ABC News’s Matthew Forman and Flor Tolentino contributed to this report.

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