Post-Floyd investigation revealed discrimination by Minneapolis police 2022-04-27 12:24:30

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St. POOL, Minnesota (AP) – The Minneapolis Police Department has engaged in a pattern of racial discrimination for at least the past decade, including stopping and arresting blacks at a higher rate than whites, using force more often on people of color and maintaining a culture where discrimination is tolerated. Racist language, revealed a government investigation launched after the murder of George Floyd.

The report released Wednesday by the Minnesota Department of Human Rights After a nearly two-year investigation, he said, the agency and city would negotiate a consent ordinance to address the problem, with input from residents, officers, city employees and others.

The report said the police department’s data “show significant racial disparities regarding officers’ use of force, traffic stops, searches, citations, and arrests.” She said officers “used clandestine social media to monitor black individuals and black organizations, which had nothing to do with criminal activity, and to maintain an organizational culture where some officers and supervisors use racist, misogynistic and disrespectful language with impunity.”

Human Rights Commissioner Rebecca Lucero, during a news conference after the report was released, said he was not referring to any officers or leaders in the city.

“This investigation is not about a single individual or incident,” Lucero said.

Asked how long the consent decree might take, Lucero said, “as long as it takes to do it right.”

The report said the city and police department “do not need to wait for immediate changes to begin to address the causes of discrimination that weaken the city’s public safety system and harm members of the community.” It listed several steps the city can take now, including implementing stronger internal control to hold officers accountable for their behavior, better training, and better communication with the public about serious incidents such as shootings by officers.

National civil rights attorney Ben Crump & Associates who I won a $27 million settlement From the city to Floyd’s family, the report was described as “historic” and “huge in importance”. They said they were “gratified and very hopeful” that change was imminent.

Lawyers said in a statement letter.

The Department of Human Rights began its investigation nearly a week after Floyd’s death on May 25, 2020. Officer Derek Chauvin used his knee to hold a black man on a sidewalk for 9 1/2 minutes in a case that sparked worldwide protests against police racism and brutality. Chauvin, who is white, was convicted last spring of the murder. Three other dismissed officers – Tu Thau, Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Quinn – were convicted this year of violating Floyd’s civil rights in a federal trial and face a formal trial beginning in June.

State investigators reviewed enough information over a decade, including data on traffic stops, searches, arrests, and uses of force, and examined policies and training. The review included about 700 hours of body camera video and nearly 480,000 pages of city and police department documents. Lucero said investigators interviewed officers throughout the department and “overwhelmingly, we found the officers to be very candid.” Investigators also called on citizens to provide their own stories about their encounters with Minneapolis police.

The Minnesota Department of Human Rights is the state’s civil rights enforcement agency. Her duties include enforcing the Minnesota Human Rights Act which, among other things, makes it illegal for a police department to discriminate against someone because of their race.

“Race-based policing is illegal and particularly harmful to people of color and indigenous people – sometimes costing their lives,” the report said.

The administration has come under pressure from multiple quarters since Floyd’s death. The US Department of Justice he is too Investigating Police Practices in Minneapolisalthough he doesn’t think it’s close to being finished.

Several city council members and residents have pushed to replace the department with a new public safety unit that they say could take a more comprehensive approach to police public health, including dropping the required minimum number of police officers. Voters rejected the idea last year.

Mayor Jacob Frey and President Medaria Arradondo, before retiring in January, also made a range of changes to the department’s policies and practices, including requiring officers to document their attempts to de-escalate situations, and It no longer stops drivers for minor traffic violations.

But society’s anger at the police flared up again in February when The police officers carrying out the no-knock order shot and killed Amir Luke, a 22-year-old black man was staying on a sofa in his cousin’s apartment. Prosecutors declined to charge the officer who shot Locke, saying a body camera video showed him aiming a gun at the officer, a claim his family contested. The city has since banned orders not to strike except in extreme circumstances, such as placing hostages.

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Find AP’s full coverage of the death of George Floyd at: https://apnews.com/hub/death-of-george-floyd

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Ibrahim is an Associated Press/Reporting for America’s Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a national nonprofit service program that puts journalists in local newsrooms to report confidential issues.

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