Poll: Americans Don’t Support Elon Musk’s Free Speech Campaign on Twitter 2022-04-29 15:43:52

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Data: Axios/Ipsos survey; Note: The sum of the numbers may not reach 100% due to rounding; Chart: Kavya Bahraj / Axios

Elon Musk will likely discover that there isn’t much market for his campaign for more Freedom of expression on Twitteraccording to Ipsos Poll Shared exclusively with Axios.

The Big Picture: According to the survey, most Americans have no problem with Twitter or other social media companies removing posts that include misinformation, promote violence, or pose a risk to the public.

  • They are more likely to oppose the removal of posts that promote political action or contain hot political speech.

In numbers: 73% of respondents said they supported removing posts that might contain false information, while only 20% said they were against removing those posts.

  • 83% said they would support removing posts that promote violence against certain individuals or groups.
  • 79% said they would support the removal of posts that pose a risk to the public.
  • Americans are more divided over the removal of political office. Only 47% support removing posts that promote political action, while 40% oppose it.
  • And 54% support the removal of posts that contain hot political speech, while 36% oppose it.

Between the lines: The survey also found that most Americans do not have strong opinions about what Misk’s deal to buy Twitter It would mean for a social media platform – unless you’re heavily online.

  • Only 39% of respondents said that Musk would improve the quality of discussion on Twitter, while 22% said it would get worse.
  • But among large, self-described Twitter users, 52% said their engagement would improve the quality of discussion, while 29% said it would get worse.
  • Similarly, 44% of all respondents said that Musk would lead Twitter to allow more freedom of expression, while 12% said it would allow less freedom of speech. But among heavy Twitter users, 54% said their participation would lead to more freedom of expression, while 21% said it would lead to less freedom of expression.
  • For non-users, by far the most common response was “I don’t know”. (About four out of 10 said that about both questions.)

METHODOLOGY: This Ipsos survey was conducted April 26-27 from a sample of 1,000 adults aged 18 or over, drawn at random fromIpsos Dashboard Onlineand online partner panel resources andSampling from the “river”.

  • The accuracy of Ipsos surveys is measured online using a file credibility period. In this case, the survey has a reliability interval of plus or minus 3.8 percentage points for all respondents.

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